Thursday, April 16, 2015

Willie Robertson's Doctrine of Scripture

Recently I and my wife watched a move on Netflix titled, "God's Not Dead".  The main premise of the movie centers around a philosophy course at a secular college where the professor asks each student to write the words, "God is dead" on a blank piece of paper. One student who is a Christian refuses to sign the paper to his atheist professors dismay.

The plot then builds up to where the professor gives the student an opportunity to make his arguments for why he thinks God is not dead and in fact does exist. There are a few other subplots going on that involve other Christians and the struggles they face when the ones close to them to not share their new worldview.

One of the characters is a liberal reporter who ends up stalking Willie & Korie Robertson to try and trip them up. Then Willie Robertson says something after he quotes a verse from the Bible that includes the words of Christ, Willie says, "Now those words are in red so they are really important."

What Willie Robertson is saying is that Jesus' words that are typically found in a red font in most bibles have a much higher degree of importance than the words of scripture that do not. It's important to understand the significance of this distinction as it essentially undermines the inspiration of scripture.

The apostle Paul writing to Timothy in 2 Timothy 3:16 says:

"All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness."

Now it has to be given that at the time that this was written the Old Testament is what was being referenced as the New Testament canon had not yet been finalized and sanctioned by the church. Notice he makes no distinctions in which he very easily could have. It would be like Paul giving preference to the versus where "Thus sayeth the Lord...", but he doesn't. Why?

Because he knows especially as a recovering pharisee that the entire library of scripture is the word of God and not just specific sections.

There are some logical implications if one adopts Willie Robertson's fragmented view of scripture; Jesus never said that his mother was a virgin when she conceived him. Does this mean since he didn't say it that we should take the gospel account with a low confidence level? Of course not, but if we take Willie Robertson's view of scripture you have no option but to question the portion of scripture that are in black font.






No comments:

Post a Comment